Power

Some weeks ago, I came across this quote, from the inspiring writing of Rowan Pendragon:

‘Don’t be afraid of the word “power” or to call yourself powerful. If you’re not owning your power, someone else is!’

Short and sweet. But it stuck with me.

At the end of July, my partner and I took our annual trip to Druid Camp. I realized that I’d been going there for over ten years now, and every single year is different – usually with new things to learn, and experiences that push me forward (often in a quite undignified way). It’s a powerful time, as well as one of great community and friendship.

This year’s theme was the Cauldron of Cerridwen, the Tale of Taliesin. We were there to be inspired, after all, and for the duration of the week, a huge black cauldron was placed in the centre of the Camp, in the ritual circle that we created, into which we would place our offerings – as well as take time to guard it. This latter time became quite a social gathering as people came forward to talk, very much in the presence of the divine brew, words spilling forth and being heard. The rite culminated on Saturday in a great gathering of over 100 people, coming together to work with the Goddess, Cauldron, the Awen and what came forth from it.

Every evening, different groups were asked to perform ritual for the Camp as a whole, with my own Hearth undertaking the Friday night. What would be our focus? How would we tie in to this theme of inspiration, as well as facilitate a meaningful ceremony for what could well be quite a number of people of very varied shades of belief?

I suggested power. We invite those present to step forward, into the centre of the circle, and tell all present who they are, what they are doing, and what they promise to achieve in the next year – until we meet again at Camp 2012. Including ourselves.

And so we did. Around 50 people bravely stepped forward, making their vows, telling their tales, as the energy moved around the circle holding us together. Our community was strong, our inspiration flowed… and we all moved forward.

(Photo by William Camden Harding)

Last weekend was the annual Pagan Pride festival in Nottingham. Over 500 pagans, dressed in their finest, gathered in the centre of a modern Midlands city to march and declare their faith and unity. On a Sunday morning. Just as the shops were opening.

And again, we did it. So many people told me that it was their first ever pagan event… as we strode through the Marketplace and down the centre of the Boulevard! Police stopped traffic, Muggles lined the streets to stare and take photographs. Drums beat a compelling rhythm as we all shouted ‘We Are Pagan – We Are Proud!’

On both days, many people stood up publicly and proudly and declared themselves. All ages, all colours, all physical and mental ability. They claimed their own personal power, displayed their bravery in stating their words, proud in their resolve and determination. To quote a Druid phrase, ‘Heart to heart, hand to hand.’ Each time, the energy is tangible, active and potent.

Since then, the atmosphere in Britain has changed. Public displays of power are there for all to see: the anger of burning buildings, communities retaliating with brooms. Both groups joining on virtual networks before meeting in person. Everyone has something to say.

I sincerely hope that the displays of power that I have experienced this last month have been indicative of a growth in the sense of unity, joined community and like-mindedness. For too long, we have witnessed largely apathy, whingeing and unwillingness to take action. A change is in the air, it seems now, as people are starting to move, realizing the importance of our actions in life, taking a stand for their beliefs. Slowly, there is recognition of greater need for articulation, intelligent debate, asking questions.

We stand in our power, here, together. What do we do with it?

We move forward.

 

For more on Pagan Pride, visit organiser Esme Knight’s wonderful blog, or see more pictures c/o the BBC.

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3 Comments »

  1. The notion that ‘power corrupts’ is very much out there, but we probably don’t spend enough time contemplating what an absence of power, or a refusal of it, does to people.

    All power to you Cat!

  2. Gayle said

    Muggles? Don’t you mean ‘people who don’t happen to agree with my point of view and beliefs’? For a ‘faith’ that purports to be respectful and tolerant, I ain’t feeling that from this blog.

    • druidcat said

      Nope – I’ve said often, that I mean Muggles as JK Rowling did: ‘non-magical folk’. Basically shorthand for regular people unfamiliar with pagan practice. That’s all. I’ve actually found relatively few people who don’t ‘agree with my point of view and beliefs’ – most have been curious and questioning, insightful and asking things that make me question why I do what I do. So I absolutely have respect for folk of all paths. I find if folk want to cause offence, it’s usually pretty clear!

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